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Monthly Magazine

 

Each month we produce a magazine, "The Over Alderley and Birtles Monthly Messsenger", this being the title used for the first parish magazine produced from 1892 to 1908 by the second Vicar of Birtles, The Revd Henry Waldron Bradley.

Here are some snippets ...

More than 100 years ago ... 

July 1902 arrived but without the expected celebrations to mark the coronation of King Edward V11 who had been taken ill 48 hours before the event. Mr Bradley wrote …
“In this parish all Coronation festivities were for the time cancelled. At best they could only have been held under a cloud of anxiety and with a prevailing sense of incongruity. We had not indeed prepared on such a large scale as some parishes – people seem shy of spending money! – nevertheless there would have been a good programme for the young people: tea, mugs, medals, sports, balloons, and a bonfire: in which the elders could have joined picnic fashion”.
The Messenger continued urging for prayers for the King’s speedy recovery from his operation and speaking fulsomely of his regal characteristics.


The month had much other news; the South African war was over and there was rejoicing in the victory. This also meant the return home of Lieutenant J Charles Brooks marked by a welcoming event at the hall with “Birtles Park being made resplendent with flags, banners and triumphal arches” when a large number of friends and neighbours assembled in front of the hall and Mr F D Brocklehurst addressed a few words of welcome to the hero. After photographs had been taken Mr and Mrs Close Brooks invited the whole company to a sumptuous lunch in the gymnasium.
It appears that the summer had turned wet and none of the four advertised cricket matches being able to be played. Day School had broken up and the extra week of holiday taken despite the cancellation of the coronation. No doubt there were some very happy children!


The Bradley’s had returned from their holiday and it seems their locum Revd. F W Macdonald had been well received and praised for his ministry and diligent visiting around the parish. He in turn spoke of the kindness of people and the beauty of the district.


July 1902 arrived but without the expected celebrations to mark the coronation of King Edward V11 who had been taken ill 48 hours before the event. Mr Bradley wrote …


“In this parish all Coronation festivities were for the time cancelled. At best they could only have been held under a cloud of anxiety and with a prevailing sense of incongruity. We had not indeed prepared on such a large scale as some parishes – people seem shy of spending money! – nevertheless there would have been a good programme for the young people: tea, mugs, medals, sports, balloons, and a bonfire: in which the elders could have joined picnic fashion”.


The Messenger continued urging for prayers for the King’s speedy recovery from his operation and speaking fulsomely of his regal characteristics.


The month had much other news; the South African war was over and there was rejoicing in the victory. This also meant the return home of Lieutenant J Charles Brooks marked by a welcoming event at the hall with “Birtles Park being made resplendent with flags, banners and triumphal arches” when a large number of friends and neighbours assembled in front of the hall and Mr F D Brocklehurst addressed a few words of welcome to the hero. After photographs had been taken Mr and Mrs Close Brooks invited the whole company to a sumptuous lunch in the gymnasium.


It appears that the summer had turned wet and none of the four advertised cricket matches being able to be played. Day School had broken up and the extra week of holiday taken despite the cancellation of the coronation. No doubt there were some very happy children!


The Bradley’s had returned from their holiday and it seems their locum Revd. F W Macdonald had been well received and praised for his ministry and diligent visiting around the parish. He in turn spoke of the kindness of people and the beauty of the district.



July 1902 arrived but without the expected celebrations to mark the coronation of King Edward V11 who had been taken ill 48 hours before the event. Mr Bradley wrote …

“In this parish all Coronation festivities were for the time cancelled. At best they could only have been held under a cloud of anxiety and with a prevailing sense of incongruity. We had not indeed prepared on such a large scale as some parishes – people seem shy of spending money! – nevertheless there would have been a good programme for the young people: tea, mugs, medals, sports, balloons, and a bonfire: in which the elders could have joined picnic fashion”.

The Messenger continued urging for prayers for the King’s speedy recovery from his operation and speaking fulsomely of his regal characteristics.

The month had much other news; the South African war was over and there was rejoicing in the victory. This also meant the return home of Lieutenant J Charles Brooks marked by a welcoming event at the hall with “Birtles Park being made resplendent with flags, banners and triumphal arches” when a large number of friends and neighbours assembled in front of the hall and Mr F D Brocklehurst addressed a few words of welcome to the hero. After photographs had been taken Mr and Mrs Close Brooks invited the whole company to a sumptuous lunch in the gymnasium.

It appears that the summer had turned wet and none of the four advertised cricket matches being able to be played. Day School had broken up and the extra week of holiday taken despite the cancellation of the coronation. No doubt there were some very happy children!

The Bradley’s had returned from their holiday and it seems their locum Revd. F W Macdonald had been well received and praised for his ministry and diligent visiting around the parish. He in turn spoke of the kindness of people and the beauty of the district.

July 1902 arrived but without the expected celebrations to mark the coronation of King Edward V11 who had been taken ill 48 hours before the event. Mr Bradley wrote …

“In this parish all Coronation festivities were for the time cancelled. At best they could only have been held under a cloud of anxiety and with a prevailing sense of incongruity. We had not indeed prepared on such a large scale as some parishes – people seem shy of spending money! – nevertheless there would have been a good programme for the young people: tea, mugs, medals, sports, balloons, and a bonfire: in which the elders could have joined picnic fashion”.

The Messenger continued urging for prayers for the King’s speedy recovery from his operation and speaking fulsomely of his regal characteristics.

The month had much other news; the South African war was over and there was rejoicing in the victory. This also meant the return home of Lieutenant J Charles Brooks marked by a welcoming event at the hall with “Birtles Park being made resplendent with flags, banners and triumphal arches” when a large number of friends and neighbours assembled in front of the hall and Mr F D Brocklehurst addressed a few words of welcome to the hero. After photographs had been taken Mr and Mrs Close Brooks invited the whole company to a sumptuous lunch in the gymnasium.

It appears that the summer had turned wet and none of the four advertised cricket matches being able to be played. Day School had broken up and the extra week of holiday taken despite the cancellation of the coronation. No doubt there were some very happy children!

The Bradley’s had returned from their holiday and it seems their locum Revd. F W Macdonald had been well received and praised for his ministry and diligent visiting around the parish. He in turn spoke of the kindness of people and the beauty of the district.

July 1902 arrived but without the expected celebrations to mark the coronation of King Edward V11 who had been taken ill 48 hours before the event. Mr Bradley wrote …

“In this parish all Coronation festivities were for the time cancelled. At best they could only have been held under a cloud of anxiety and with a prevailing sense of incongruity. We had not indeed prepared on such a large scale as some parishes – people seem shy of spending money! – nevertheless there would have been a good programme for the young people: tea, mugs, medals, sports, balloons, and a bonfire: in which the elders could have joined picnic fashion”.

The Messenger continued urging for prayers for the King’s speedy recovery from his operation and speaking fulsomely of his regal characteristics.

The month had much other news; the South African war was over and there was rejoicing in the victory. This also meant the return home of Lieutenant J Charles Brooks marked by a welcoming event at the hall with “Birtles Park being made resplendent with flags, banners and triumphal arches” when a large number of friends and neighbours assembled in front of the hall and Mr F D Brocklehurst addressed a few words of welcome to the hero. After photographs had been taken Mr and Mrs Close Brooks invited the whole company to a sumptuous lunch in the gymnasium.

It appears that the summer had turned wet and none of the four advertised cricket matches being able to be played. Day School had broken up and the extra week of holiday taken despite the cancellation of the coronation. No doubt there were some very happy children!

The Bradley’s had returned from their holiday and it seems their locum Revd. F W Macdonald had been well received and praised for his ministry and diligent visiting around the parish. He in turn spoke of the kindness of people and the beauty of the district.


June 1902 and Coronation fever was gripping the parish as the day approached when Edward VII would be crowned. Mr Bradley wrote …


“Amid the general rejoicing our parish will share. The Coronation Service ordered for use in all Churches will be held at 11 o’clock in Birtles Church; so that we shall, with the rest of his loyal people, be praying with and for the King during the sacred time of him being crowned. And in the afternoon festivities are to be held and a treat, for at any rate the Children of the parish, such as we had at the late Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The details (which might well form a topic of meeting for the Parish Council to decide upon) will be announced nearer the time.”


We know of course that due to the King’s sudden illness at the last moment this didn’t happen and next month will report on the confusion this caused locally.


Another outbreak of measles was sweeping the area with the school and the neighbouring ones of Henbury and Siddington all being closed. Fortunately, at the time of the June Messenger being written it was felt that the worst of the epidemic was over.


 We forget that in this country at least measles is no longer the killer disease it was at one time.  However, no other vaccine-preventable disease causes as many deaths. In 1980, 2.6 million people died of it,[and in 1990, 545,000 died.


Holiday time for the Bradley’s was approaching with three weeks away visiting  Cheltenham, Bath, Wells, Poulton, London and Hertford. During this time The Rev. F W McDonald would reside at the Vicarage and take over the cure of souls in the parish.





June 1902 and Coronation fever was gripping the parish as the day approached when Edward VII would be crowned. Mr Bradley wrote …


“Amid the general rejoicing our parish will share. The Coronation Service ordered for use in all Churches will be held at 11 o’clock in Birtles Church; so that we shall, with the rest of his loyal people, be praying with and for the King during the sacred time of him being crowned. And in the afternoon festivities are to be held and a treat, for at any rate the Children of the parish, such as we had at the late Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The details (which might well form a topic of meeting for the Parish Council to decide upon) will be announced nearer the time.”


We know of course that due to the King’s sudden illness at the last moment this didn’t happen and next month will report on the confusion this caused locally.


Another outbreak of measles was sweeping the area with the school and the neighbouring ones of Henbury and Siddington all being closed. Fortunately, at the time of the June Messenger being written it was felt that the worst of the epidemic was over.


 We forget that in this country at least measles is no longer the killer disease it was at one time.  However, no other vaccine-preventable disease causes as many deaths. In 1980, 2.6 million people died of it,[and in 1990, 545,000 died.


Holiday time for the Bradley’s was approaching with three weeks away visiting  Cheltenham, Bath, Wells, Poulton, London and Hertford. During this time The Rev. F W McDonald would reside at the Vicarage and take over the cure of souls in the parish.



June 1902 and Coronation fever was gripping the parish as the day approached when Edward VII would be crowned. Mr Bradley wrote …


“Amid the general rejoicing our parish will share. The Coronation Service ordered for use in all Churches will be held at 11 o’clock in Birtles Church; so that we shall, with the rest of his loyal people, be praying with and for the King during the sacred time of him being crowned. And in the afternoon festivities are to be held and a treat, for at any rate the Children of the parish, such as we had at the late Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The details (which might well form a topic of meeting for the Parish Council to decide upon) will be announced nearer the time.”


We know of course that due to the King’s sudden illness at the last moment this didn’t happen and next month will report on the confusion this caused locally.


Another outbreak of measles was sweeping the area with the school and the neighbouring ones of Henbury and Siddington all being closed. Fortunately, at the time of the June Messenger being written it was felt that the worst of the epidemic was over.


 We forget that in this country at least measles is no longer the killer disease it was at one time.  However, no other vaccine-preventable disease causes as many deaths. In 1980, 2.6 million people died of it,[and in 1990, 545,000 died.


Holiday time for the Bradley’s was approaching with three weeks away visiting  Cheltenham, Bath, Wells, Poulton, London and Hertford. During this time The Rev. F W McDonald would reside at the Vicarage and take over the cure of souls in the parish.


June 1902 and Coronation fever was gripping the parish as the day approached when Edward VII would be crowned. Mr Bradley wrote …


“Amid the general rejoicing our parish will share. The Coronation Service ordered for use in all Churches will be held at 11 o’clock in Birtles Church; so that we shall, with the rest of his loyal people, be praying with and for the King during the sacred time of him being crowned. And in the afternoon festivities are to be held and a treat, for at any rate the Children of the parish, such as we had at the late Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The details (which might well form a topic of meeting for the Parish Council to decide upon) will be announced nearer the time.”


We know of course that due to the King’s sudden illness at the last moment this didn’t happen and next month will report on the confusion this caused locally.


Another outbreak of measles was sweeping the area with the school and the neighbouring ones of Henbury and Siddington all being closed. Fortunately, at the time of the June Messenger being written it was felt that the worst of the epidemic was over.


 We forget that in this country at least measles is no longer the killer disease it was at one time.  However, no other vaccine-preventable disease causes as many deaths. In 1980, 2.6 million people died of it,[and in 1990, 545,000 died.


Holiday time for the Bradley’s was approaching with three weeks away visiting  Cheltenham, Bath, Wells, Poulton, London and Hertford. During this time The Rev. F W McDonald would reside at the Vicarage and take over the cure of souls in the parish.


June 1902 and Coronation fever was gripping the parish as the day approached when Edward VII would be crowned. Mr Bradley wrote …


“Amid the general rejoicing our parish will share. The Coronation Service ordered for use in all Churches will be held at 11 o’clock in Birtles Church; so that we shall, with the rest of his loyal people, be praying with and for the King during the sacred time of him being crowned. And in the afternoon festivities are to be held and a treat, for at any rate the Children of the parish, such as we had at the late Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The details (which might well form a topic of meeting for the Parish Council to decide upon) will be announced nearer the time.”


We know of course that due to the King’s sudden illness at the last moment this didn’t happen and next month will report on the confusion this caused locally.


Another outbreak of measles was sweeping the area with the school and the neighbouring ones of Henbury and Siddington all being closed. Fortunately, at the time of the June Messenger being written it was felt that the worst of the epidemic was over.


 We forget that in this country at least measles is no longer the killer disease it was at one time.  However, no other vaccine-preventable disease causes as many deaths. In 1980, 2.6 million people died of it,[and in 1990, 545,000 died.


Holiday time for the Bradley’s was approaching with three weeks away visiting  Cheltenham, Bath, Wells, Poulton, London and Hertford. During this time The Rev. F W McDonald would reside at the Vicarage and take over the cure of souls in the parish.



June 1902 and Coronation fever was gripping the parish as the day approached when Edward VII would be crowned. Mr Bradley wrote …


“Amid the general rejoicing our parish will share. The Coronation Service ordered for use in all Churches will be held at 11 o’clock in Birtles Church; so that we shall, with the rest of his loyal people, be praying with and for the King during the sacred time of him being crowned. And in the afternoon festivities are to be held and a treat, for at any rate the Children of the parish, such as we had at the late Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The details (which might well form a topic of meeting for the Parish Council to decide upon) will be announced nearer the time.”


We know of course that due to the King’s sudden illness at the last moment this didn’t happen and next month will report on the confusion this caused locally.


Another outbreak of measles was sweeping the area with the school and the neighbouring ones of Henbury and Siddington all being closed. Fortunately, at the time of the June Messenger being written it was felt that the worst of the epidemic was over.


 We forget that in this country at least measles is no longer the killer disease it was at one time.  However, no other vaccine-preventable disease causes as many deaths. In 1980, 2.6 million people died of it,[and in 1990, 545,000 died.


Holiday time for the Bradley’s was approaching with three weeks away visiting  Cheltenham, Bath, Wells, Poulton, London and Hertford. During this time The Rev. F W McDonald would reside at the Vicarage and take over the cure of souls in the parish.



June 1902 and Coronation fever was gripping the parish as the day approached when Edward VII would be crowned. Mr Bradley wrote …


“Amid the general rejoicing our parish will share. The Coronation Service ordered for use in all Churches will be held at 11 o’clock in Birtles Church; so that we shall, with the rest of his loyal people, be praying with and for the King during the sacred time of him being crowned. And in the afternoon festivities are to be held and a treat, for at any rate the Children of the parish, such as we had at the late Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The details (which might well form a topic of meeting for the Parish Council to decide upon) will be announced nearer the time.”


We know of course that due to the King’s sudden illness at the last moment this didn’t happen and next month will report on the confusion this caused locally.


Another outbreak of measles was sweeping the area with the school and the neighbouring ones of Henbury and Siddington all being closed. Fortunately, at the time of the June Messenger being written it was felt that the worst of the epidemic was over.


 We forget that in this country at least measles is no longer the killer disease it was at one time.  However, no other vaccine-preventable disease causes as many deaths. In 1980, 2.6 million people died of it,[and in 1990, 545,000 died.


Holiday time for the Bradley’s was approaching with three weeks away visiting  Cheltenham, Bath, Wells, Poulton, London and Hertford. During this time The Rev. F W McDonald would reside at the Vicarage and take over the cure of souls in the parish.




May 1902 was arriving in the parish and most of the news in the Messenger was good.

Mr Bradley used half the front page to list the School Subscriptions giving both the name and amount paid by individuals. He went on to say that this would be the last year that parishioners would need to give financial support to the school as once the Education Act was passed church schools would receive the same financing as state schools. He went on to say …

Apparently all schools are to be thrown upon the public funds. This seems just and right, whichever way one looks upon it. For looking at it from a national point of view, why should national Education (which renders as great a service to the nation as the Army and Navy) not be paid for out of national charges? Why should the cost of it be borne by private benefactors or to be dependent on any one person going around begging and instituting jumble sales? And then, viewed from a religious point of view, is it right for "Christian England" to tax and penalise religion in such a way that (as is the case now) only those schools can help themselves out of the public purse who profess "nothing"? At the present this is practically the case.

Lieutenant Charles Close Brooks was on his way home from India. A public ovation was deemed likely. Charles was of course a great cricketer and the Birtles captain so he would have been thrilled to learn that the first match of season played against Adlington Park had been a handsome win for Birtles.

The vicar was back in whites and was the second highest scorer and he took a catch. Well held Sir!

May 1902 was arriving in the parish and most of the news in the Messenger was good.

Mr Bradley used half the front page to list the School Subscriptions giving both the name and amount paid by individuals. He went on to say that this would be the last year that parishioners would need to give financial support to the school as once the Education Act was passed church schools would receive the same financing as state schools. He went on to say …

Apparently all schools are to be thrown upon the public funds. This seems just and right, whichever way one looks upon it. For looking at it from a national point of view, why should national Education (which renders as great a service to the nation as the Army and Navy) not be paid for out of national charges? Why should the cost of it be borne by private benefactors or to be dependent on any one person going around begging and instituting jumble sales? And then, viewed from a religious point of view, is it right for "Christian England" to tax and penalise religion in such a way that (as is the case now) only those schools can help themselves out of the public purse who profess "nothing"? At the present this is practically the case.

Lieutenant Charles Close Brooks was on his way home from India. A public ovation was deemed likely. Charles was of course a great cricketer and the Birtles captain so he would have been thrilled to learn that the first match of season played against Adlington Park had been a handsome win for Birtles.

The vicar was back in whites and was the second highest scorer and he took a catch. Well held Sir!

M

May 1902 was arriving in the parish and most of the news in the Messenger was good.

Mr Bradley used half the front page to list the School Subscriptions giving both the name and amount paid by individuals. He went on to say that this would be the last year that parishioners would need to give financial support to the school as once the Education Act was passed church schools would receive the same financing as state schools. He went on to say …

Apparently all schools are to be thrown upon the public funds. This seems just and right, whichever way one looks upon it. For looking at it from a national point of view, why should national Education (which renders as great a service to the nation as the Army and Navy) not be paid for out of national charges? Why should the cost of it be borne by private benefactors or to be dependent on any one person going around begging and instituting jumble sales? And then, viewed from a religious point of view, is it right for “Christian England” to tax and penalise religion in such a way that (as is the case now) only those schools can help themselves out of the public purse who profess “nothing”? At the present this is practically the case.

Lieutenant Charles Close Brooks was on his way home from India. A public ovation was deemed likely. Charles was of course a great cricketer and the Birtles captain so he would have been thrilled to learn that the first match of season played against Adlington Park had been a handsome win for Birtles.

The vicar was back in whites and was the second highest scorer and he took a catch. Well held Sir!

ay 1902 was arriving in the parish and most of the news in the Messenger was good.


Mr Bradley used half the front page to list the School Subscriptions giving both the name and amount paid by individuals. He went on to say that this would be the last year that parishioners would need to give financial support to the school as once the Education Act was passed church schools would receive the same financing as state schools. He went on to say …


Apparently all schools are to be thrown upon the public funds. This seems just and right, whichever way one looks upon it. For looking at it from a national point of view, why should national Education (which renders as great a service to the nation as the Army and Navy) not be paid for out of national charges? Why should the cost of it be borne by private benefactors or to be dependent on any one person going around begging and instituting jumble sales? And then, viewed from a religious point of view, is it right for “Christian England” to tax and penalise religion in such a way that (as is the case now) only those schools can help themselves out of the public purse who profess “nothing”? At the present this is practically the case.


Lieutenant Charles Close Brooks was on his way home from India. A public ovation was deemed likely. Charles was of course a great cricketer and the Birtles captain so he would have been thrilled to learn that the first match of season played against Adlington Park had been a handsome win for Birtles.


The vicar was back in whites and was the second highest scorer and he took a catch. Well held Sir!





MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO …


May 1902 was arriving in the parish and most of the news in the Messenger was good.


Mr Bradley used half the front page to list the School Subscriptions giving both the name and amount paid by individuals. He went on to say that this would be the last year that parishioners would need to give financial support to the school as once the Education Act was passed church schools would receive the same financing as state schools. He went on to say …


Apparently all schools are to be thrown upon the public funds. This seems just and right, whichever way one looks upon it. For looking at it from a national point of view, why should national Education (which renders as great a service to the nation as the Army and Navy) not be paid for out of national charges? Why should the cost of it be borne by private benefactors or to be dependent on any one person going around begging and instituting jumble sales? And then, viewed from a religious point of view, is it right for “Christian England” to tax and penalise religion in such a way that (as is the case now) only those schools can help themselves out of the public purse who profess “nothing”? At the present this is practically the case.


Lieutenant Charles Close Brooks was on his way home from India. A public ovation was deemed likely. Charles was of course a great cricketer and the Birtles captain so he would have been thrilled to learn that the first match of season played against Adlington Park had been a handsome win for Birtles.


The vicar was back in whites and was the second highest scorer and he took a catch. Well held Sir!



MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO …


May 1902 was arriving in the parish and most of the news in the Messenger was good.


Mr Bradley used half the front page to list the School Subscriptions giving both the name and amount paid by individuals. He went on to say that this would be the last year that parishioners would need to give financial support to the school as once the Education Act was passed church schools would receive the same financing as state schools. He went on to say …


Apparently all schools are to be thrown upon the public funds. This seems just and right, whichever way one looks upon it. For looking at it from a national point of view, why should national Education (which renders as great a service to the nation as the Army and Navy) not be paid for out of national charges? Why should the cost of it be borne by private benefactors or to be dependent on any one person going around begging and instituting jumble sales? And then, viewed from a religious point of view, is it right for “Christian England” to tax and penalise religion in such a way that (as is the case now) only those schools can help themselves out of the public purse who profess “nothing”? At the present this is practically the case.


Lieutenant Charles Close Brooks was on his way home from India. A public ovation was deemed likely. Charles was of course a great cricketer and the Birtles captain so he would have been thrilled to learn that the first match of season played against Adlington Park had been a handsome win for Birtles.


The vicar was back in whites and was the second highest scorer and he took a catch. Well held Sir!

RE T

HAN ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO …



May 1902 was arriving in the parish and most of the news in the Messenger was good.

Mr Bradley used half the front page to list the School Subscriptions giving both the name and amount paid by individuals. He went on to say that this would be the last year that parishioners would need to give financial support to the school as once the Education Act was passed church schools would receive the same financing as state schools. He went on to say …

Apparently all schools are to be thrown upon the public funds. This seems just and right, whichever way one looks upon it. For looking at it from a national point of view, why should national Education (which renders as great a service to the nation as the Army and Navy) not be paid for out of national charges? Why should the cost of it be borne by private benefactors or to be dependent on any one person going around begging and instituting jumble sales? And then, viewed from a religious point of view, is it right for “Christian England” to tax and penalise religion in such a way that (as is the case now) only those schools can help themselves out of the public purse who profess “nothing”? At the present this is practically the case.

Lieutenant Charles Close Brooks was on his way home from India. A public ovation was deemed likely. Charles was of course a great cricketer and the Birtles captain so he would have been thrilled to learn that the first match of season played against Adlington Park had been a handsome win for Birtles.

The vicar was back in whites and was the second highest scorer and he took a catch. Well held Sir!






Contact

Birtles Lane 

Macclesfield 

Cheshire 

SK10 4RX